The Neutrals

Here’s where I am not sure if I was in the right mood for browns and greys. However, the light greys have cool undertones and the browns aren’t just plain old brown. Included in this photo op is the “view of the Guadalupe” and “Gladys.” Guadalupe sold the day I brought her in so this is a second round.

 

 

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Orange Palette

For some reason I’ve gone antique. Here’s the additions to my color palette for 2014-2015!

New Palette

Merino 600

600 YARDS, 6 oz. | SUPER WASH MERINO | SMOOTH HAND | FINGERING WEIGHT | $32.00 PER SKEIN

L = Long Color Change | M = Medium | MO = Mottled or Marbled

Indian Summer

Indian Summer

Modeled Colors…and Olann

By the way, I am totally grateful to Laura for bringing this to my attention. Thank you!

 

The meaning of Olann

Olann is the Irish word for wool and it is the inspiration for and primary material used in the yarn we dye. I tend to pull from my Scots Irish, Welsh and Austrian-by-marriage roots. Since our single ply sport and worsted are 100% wool, I felt it was right and proper to use a pretty name…Olann. My ancestors would agree 🙂 Next…

Mottled v. Modeled

So I received a positive feedback today reminding me that I really need to double check my descriptive words before publishing. Wearing too many hats in the business can lead to laziness. For a few months now I have been producing modeled colors. I guess the colors have been modeling for some time. Thankfully they don’t have expensive hourly rates. Only my super model colors.

At The Sheepwalk we produced yarn with long color changes, medium color changes (less striped and more pooled), mottled color changes (splotchy or marbled – I checked my dictionary to be sure of this!) and sometimes we have nearly solid colors. I rarely put the solids online because they are usually scheduled for a color change since the point of “hand dyed” is to make the yarn look…well, hand dyed.

For the savvy passer-by’s, we like to use several techniques to get our colors the way they are. Some cases require a paint brush and a steady hand to avoid spotting or dripping. Other cases require days of staring at the yarn until we find the right complimentary color to make that boring skein look like a super model.

BELOW ARE EXAMPLES OF WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT.

Olann “Sport”

“Olann” is Irish Gaelic for “Wool”

210 YARDS APPROX. | 100% Wool [RAMBOUILLET BLEND] | SMOOTH HAND | WORSTED WEIGHT | $12.80 PER SKEIN
Wool is grown, spun and loved in the Good Ol’ U.S.A!

L = Long Color Change | M = Medium | MO = Mottled

*IMAGES APPEAR BRIGHTER IN THE PHOTO (BECAUSE MY CAMERA IS WEIRD)

Recalibrating!

“So here’s the deal,” as Gus would say… our brains have to be calibrated much like a printing machine. Sometimes we look at color and see blah. I could have had a panic attack. Or, walked away from the task. Instead, I decided to sacrifice 18 skeins of worsted super wash merino to a good cause…recalibrating my brain! This is so necessary because the skeins could ultimately be dyed over and maybe from that color you might see another possibility. So if I were going to teach a dye class, I would require all my students to make a rainbow. They choose the depth and intensity. I hand my students the dye, the yarn and then my blessings. Now if I could just get my camera to take a decent photo 🙂

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Welsh Green

Well, the quest is quite simple. Create a green that could make a dragon come to life. This is my kind of quest because I am not repeat dying anything. This is raw, experimental and exhilarating. What is Welsh green? It’s gold, bright, deep, luminous, and not that easy to make. After several variations of layering the color, I decided the yellows were too strong but if I could get just some glint of yellow then I would be happy. Where do I go from here? The next color to help make the Welsh dragon pop off it’s knitted canvas is a deep, rich blue sky and dramatic reds to edge and highlight. Enjoy!

1372961290 Common_Welsh_Green_by_Mathas

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What the girls are up to…

Christine has been busy with her leftover scarves using our hand dyed merino 600 fingering and the linen stitch.

Jeanne just finished her pink sweater using our hand dyed merino 500 sport weight yarn in a perfectly pink colorway.

I have finished the “Barley” cowl by Tin Can knits and have begun the next sample making project.

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Tin Can Knits inspired me!

So we have several awesome ladies who love to scour Ravelry for great pattern ideas. Sometimes the pattern chooses the yarn, but in my case the yarn really needed to choose the pattern. I needed a well-written pattern that I could explain to my customers. The pattern needed to help me show the way the colors pool or transition. This week I chose “Barley” and “Oats.”

Yarn: Olann “Worsted” (1 skein for the sample, but would be awesome with two skeins, adds more depth)

Needle of choice: US 9 / 24″ circ

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Pattern links are below…

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